Alberta Clipper

I have lots and lots of quilts in progress at any given point in time.  I don’t think this is an uncommon thing for a quilter, especially given all the finish-alongs that you can join.  This summer, I’ve been trying to work on putting together my UFOs.  Well, at least turning them in to finished tops.  The most recent one to join the finished tops list is the quilt made from blocks from the Simply Solids bee.

quilt-blocks

This is the sketch I made in EQ6 when I drafted the block pattern. I had planned to sash the blocks and set them straight.

Simply Solids Bee, Carmine Group - May blocks

Then I laid them out without sashing once I had gotten them all in the mail, and decided that they looked better that way. I particularly liked the little diamonds that formed in the corners where the blocks met.

Simply Solids Bee - Carmine

This is what I ended up with. I put them on point! And I love it! I needed 18 blocks for this setting, so I made a few more to add to the ones that my hive mates made me. Then I auditioned different colours for the setting triangles, but no one fabric fit with the very colourful blocks. So I picked all the options and used a different colour for each setting triangle. It is so full of in-your-face colour. It is so, so me.

Simply Solids Bee - Carmine

I finished the top last week, but I had to wait for Mr. Apple Pie to be home so that he could hold it while I took a picture.

Simply Solids Bee - Carmine

The colours in these shots are very close to what it looks like in person. The purple in the bottom left block is a little greyish in front of the garden, but other than that, this is Alberta Clipper in all of its saturated glory. My tutorial is here, if any of you want to make it.

This top makes me very happy.  The solids are awesome!  The top is awesome!  I’m so happy I picked this block!  Now I just have to decide how to quilt it.  Any suggestions?

I’m linking up to TGIFF, hosted by Pippa’s Patch this week.

Falling for Stripes

At the end of July, M-R of Quilt Matters put out a call for pattern testers for her new pattern, Falling for Stripes.  I really like the pattern, so I volunteered, and was one of a chosen few.  Yay!  It went together very quickly, actually.  I worked on it mostly in the evenings, and I think it took about 4 nights from cutting to having the top done.

Pattern Testing for M-R

It is not huge, about 46″ x 55″, I think. There is the option in this pattern to have a multi-coloured background, but with the stripe I chose to focus on, the wavy, wonky blocks needed some calming down, so I went with the one-colour background, and chose white.

Pattern Testing for M-R

I think Thing 1 was actually holding it up upside-down here, but it looks good that way too!

Pattern Testing for M-R

Here it is, right side up. I like the wonky-ness of it. I like structure and perfectly matching seams, so it was a little difficult for me to let go of that well ordered way of quilting. But I really like the result.

Pattern Testing for M-R

I don’t know if you can tell here, but I accidentally ended up using two different whites. There is a slightly warmer white around the smaller block, to the right and to the bottom. Oh well. That’s what happens when you sew at night under poor lighting conditions, I guess. I’ve decided it adds to the wonky-ness of the quilt and will not be changing it. I came to this decision because I don’t like unpicking seams. 🙂

I’m linking up to the Needle and Thread Network, as it’s Wednesday today.

Bugs in Paris 2

I know, Bugs in Paris 2, the most original name ever.  This is the second commissioned quilt that I recently completed.  She requested that I use long strips, but didn’t want just long horizontal or vertical stripes, so we came up with this compromise instead.  It was incredibly easy and quick to put together.  I started with a general size that I wanted the quilt to finish at, then subtracted the borders, and divided the remaining size into quadrants.  I cut strips into two lengths, one set for the vertical stripes, the other for the horizontal stripes, and added 1.5″ for possible errors. I used widths varying sizes from 1.5″ to 2.5″ and sewed strip sets together until I had the height that I needed.  I then squared them up and once I had the 4 quadrants done, I sewed those together and added borders.

Bugs in Paris 2

My corn has grown a lot in the month since the first commissioned quilt was completed. It did suffer a slight delay from hail damage, but it has rebounded nicely. In a month, it will be too tall to take quilt pictures on this fence. But then I’ll get yummy fresh corn on the cob, so it’s an easy trade to make.

Bugs in Paris 2

I quilted each strip individually with the loop de loop pattern that I’ve been practicing a fair bit lately. And I’m amazed by how much the practice is helping. This quilting pattern is very easy for me to do now. Practicing new quilting patterns has been added to my ever growing list of things to do.

Bugs in Paris 2

The centre ended up looking really funky with all the loops radiating out.

Bugs in Paris 2

As requested, I used the same backing as last time. It shows up the quilting really well, which I love. I remember when I started quilting, it was so intimidating to have the quilting stitches show up on the back, since you could see the flaws more easily when you weren’t so distracted by the patterns on the front. And now I’m leaning to the opposite end of the spectrum, where I really want the quilting to show.

Bugs in Paris 2

A quilt can’t leave my house until it’s been in the ash tree, right?

Bugs in Paris 2

Bugs in Paris 2

Bugs in Paris 2